Welcome to Stage VI

Up until now, Mom’s been mostly “forgetful,” but functional. She knew where she was and what she was doing with me in my house. In the last couple of days, she’s clearly crossed over to the next level: http://www.omnimedicalsearch.com/conditions-diseases/dementia-stages.html

The other day, she was struggling to remember how to make ice water. She couldn’t figure out how to tie her shoelaces. She puts on two different shoes or leaves one off altogether. She sleeps in her clothes.

And she’s hallucinating. She’s waiting to see her long-dead father. There are people all over the house building overpasses and trestles. She was afraid to leave her “apartment” because she might trip the alarm and upset “Dan” downstairs. (We live in a one family home). She keeps asking if I’ve seen her husband (Dad died in 2004, and when reminded, she knows it). She’s been looking for my cat, Grady, who died last year.

I knew she wasn’t going to get better, but it’s still kind of a shock.

And it just started snowing here in Ringwood.

Thank goodness she has long-term care. She’s going to need it.

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About traceysl

Digital Artist, creative technologist, problem-solving lover of life. Having cared for my mother, who died on April 14, 2015 after a long fight with dementia, I have refocused professionally to helping others through my experience. I have started a company called Grand Family Planning to provide unique Family Support Services. In this way, I share my knowledge and give meaning to the tragic turn of my parents' journey through the misery of dementia.
This entry was posted in aging, caregiving, dementia, life changes. Bookmark the permalink.

2 Responses to Welcome to Stage VI

  1. Maureen says:

    Hello Tracey, found your blog after reading your post on Caregiver.com. I live in Teaneck. Please believe that your postings do help others, even if just to demystify what they have not experienced. My Mom said to me this morning, that she “was lucky to have me as her daughter”. I think your Mom is too. Hugs. Maureen

    • traceysl says:

      Hi Maureen,

      Thanks so much. Our moms are lucky indeed. And thanks so much for letting me know. Dealing with my father’s dementia six years ago was a huge eye-opener, and it helped to prepare me. It’s not easy, but I’m grateful to have the strength and resources to deal with this. Hugs back at you. Stay warm, Tracey

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